Carving a dragon #4: painting

We’re getting close to the end!  Just painting and assembly to go.

Painting.  UGH.  Have I said before how little I enjoy painting?  Here it was particularly difficult, because it was important to get some variation in the surface so it looked like wood, make the background a little darker, and not create a blotchy mess. The idea was to try to match the pear-wood being used on the remainder of the piece.

Painting supplies

Painting supplies

The piece was painted with successive thin layers of paint.  The background was painted a little darker than the surface.  The raised dragon on the finished piece was drybrushed with a lighter color.   The final piece was washed with a thin coat of dark gray water color (using a water color pencil) to get the color a little closer to the stained pear wood.

If you’re interested in learning how to simulate wood with paint (and know as little as I do)–there are a few videos on YouTube that should be helpful, both those by model builders and real life “faux bois” painters. The colors used consistently–whether full size or miniature–seem to be burnt and raw umber, burnt and raw sienna, black, and alizarin crimson. In this scale, the main messages are: use very thin coats,  bringing out the different tones in real wood–from pinks to browns to grays–with each layer. A few drops of glazing helps thin the layers.

The finished painted resin piece

The finished piece turned out reasonably well. It could look more like wood, and the scales on the tail could show up better, but it’s not bad for a first effort, and hopefully future versions of this chest will turn out better, as I learn more about painting!

The pear wood was also coated with a thin coat of paint, to create a more uniform surface and tone closer to the painted resin piece.

Brushing on paint

Brushing on a thin coat of the paint, quickly

…and then wiping it off quickly with a foam wedge

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One response

  1. Each step in the process has been equally fascinating to read about. I especially liked how you made both texture and color blend by sanding the resin to create wood grain, and toning down the real wood with paint.

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