1/1,728 scale dollhouses

It comes up occasionally that you need a dollhouse for the dollhouse inside your dollhouse.  I like to make–and occasionally teach a class where students make–workshops for a 1/144 miniaturist, who of course is making dollhouses (what a shocker). But you might have a 1/144 scale miniature shop, or just a Making Dollhouse houses from Fiddler's Greennursery or child’s room in 1/144.

There are lots of different ways you can make a tiny house.  Some folks cut them out of wood and paint them.  Others make a small printie and wrap it around a block of wood. There are also some etched brass versions from Severn Models, and tiny wooden models by Arnold Volker that you can assemble.

But I like to miniaturize card models and then cut them out and assemble them using tweezers, glue, and a bit of profanity. Fiddler’s Green is a wonderful site with card models for everything from buildings to airplanes to ships to airstreams.  Over the years, they have been very generous about letting me use their models for my classes, and suggested I put together a tutorial for the home schooler.  You can find that tutorial here: Making Dollhouse houses from Fiddler’s Green. And it comes with thanks not only to Scott Fyn of Fiddler’s Green, but Roger Pattenden, the Illinois State government, and many others for sharing their knowledge and card models over the years.

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Making a tiny carving gouge

Working in small scale often requires making your own tools (or doing without).  After a lot of searching on the internet,  I found a few, nice quality, small palm-held gouges from Two Cherries and Pfeil.  Two Cherries makes three that are 1 mm in width and various shapes (sweeps #3,  #6, #11)–the number refers to how deep the “U” of the gouge is.  Pfeil makes #11 sweep gouges in both 1 mm and 0.5 mm.

You can find these and other tools at some online stores, such as Chipping Away.  For the Pfeil tools, search for Palm Block cutters, and for the Two Cherries tools, look for their Palm Micro series.

But no one makes anything smaller than 0.5mm.  And I just wasn’t getting the scales on the 1/48th scale dragon right!

Making the groove

Getting ready to make the groove in the gouge

My friend Tom  is a wonderful turner (both full size, small, and dollhouse miniature) and loves to innovate (and share those innovations).  He gave me a few tips on how to make my own gouge.  After a few false starts and many hours of trial and error, I produced a gouge that was about 0.3 mm in diameter, smooth in shape, and shaped about like the #11 gouges I had been working with, in terms of the depth of the U.

marks

Marks made by new gouge and commercially available gouge

 

 

Finished gouge

Finished gouge

 

If you want to learn more about how to make this tool, check out a TUTORIAL: Making a tiny gouge.